Speakers

The IAFOR International Conference on Education in Hawaii (IICE) is a multidisciplinary conference held concurrently with The IAFOR International Conference on Arts & Humanities in Hawaii (IICAH). Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. Registration for either of these conferences permits attendance in both.

This page provides information about presenters. For details of presentations and other programming, please visit the Programme page.


Plenary Speakers

  • Pelika Andrade
    Pelika Andrade
    Na Maka Onaona & University of Hawaiʻi, United States
  • Chris Blake
    Chris Blake
    Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States
  • Mark K. Ellis
    Mark K. Ellis
    Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States
  • Catherine Fuller
    Catherine Fuller
    Polynesian Voyaging Society, Hawai'i, United States
  • Linda Furuto
    Linda Furuto
    University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States
  • Kai Hoshijo
    Kai Hoshijo
    Polynesian Voyaging Society & Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center, United States
  • Brendan Howe
    Brendan Howe
    Ewha Womans University, South Korea
  • Haunani Kane
    Haunani Kane
    University of Hawai‘i, United States
  • Darwin Kaneaiakala
    Darwin Kaneaiakala
    Cultural Practitioner, United States
  • Julie Kaomea
    Julie Kaomea
    University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States
  • Randy Kosaki
    Randy Kosaki
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States
  • Paul McKimmy
    Paul McKimmy
    University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, United States
  • Kanoe Morishige
    Kanoe Morishige
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States

Spotlight Speakers


Previous Speakers

View details of speakers at past IICEHawaii conferences via the links below.

Pelika Andrade
Na Maka Onaona & University of Hawaiʻi, United States

Biography

A native Hawaiian born and raised on the island of Kauaʻi, Pelika Andrade works with Na Maka Onaona, a Hawaii-based non-profit, and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College program. She has a long history of working with Hawaiian communities throughout the archipelago as a community member, sailor, voyager, cultural practitioner and researcher.

For the past twelve years, she has been developing alternate approaches to monitoring Hawaiʻi’s watersheds and has been supporting the implementation of a management strategy that supports healthy balanced communities in Hawai‘i. She is an ongoing participant in the Papahanaumokuakea Cultural Working Group and has served as chair from 2011-2014 and interim chair 2021-present. Pelika has a Master’s degree in Hawaiian studies with a focus on Malama Aina (Hawaiian Conservation) and has visited the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands many times to conduct scientific and cultural research. "I feel both honoured and privileged to be a contributing part of caring for our islands, our elder siblings, and ensuring a healthy-thriving pae'aina (archipelago) for future generations."

Chris Blake
Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States

Biography

Chris Blake currently serves as the Director of Pacific Innovations with the Office of Teaching and Learning Innovations at Kamehameha-Kapālama. In this role, he works to examine the wisdom of our ancestors and integrate it into our present knowledge to help us to navigate into the future. Chris has been an educator in the hui ʻepekema (Science) i ke kula kiʻekiʻe ma Kamehameha-Kapālama since 2000 and has been the High School Science Department Chair since 2010. Currently, he is the kumu (teacher) of Papa Kilo Hōkū (Celestial Navigation) which takes many of the components of non-instrument traditional navigation and sailing and provides a hands-on opportunity to learn from navigators and captains from the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

Chris has been working with the Polynesian Voyaging Society since 2012, connecting with Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia with the Mālama Honua -World-Wide Voyage in 2014-2017. He has continued his growth and development with Nainoa Thompson and Bruce Blankenfield with voyages to Ka Houpo o Kāne (InterTropical Convergence Zone) in May 2021 and the voyage to Papahānaumokuākea in June 2021. In 2022, he was selected for the crew on Hōkūleʻa as it voyaged on the ancient searoad of Kealaikahiki to Arutua, Rangiroa and Papaʻete in Tahiti.

Mark K. Ellis
Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States

Biography

Mark K. Ellis was born, raised, and currently lives with his ʻohana in Nuʻuanu, Oʻahu. He is a husband and father of four children. Mark is a crew member and student of navigation with the Polynesian Voyaging Society. He is a past Fellow of the First Nations’ Futures Institute at Stanford University. Mark received an undergraduate degree in Organisational Development and a master’s degree in Instructional Technology and Design. He is currently a Sr. Instructional Designer with Kamehameha Schools.

Catherine Fuller
Polynesian Voyaging Society, Hawai'i, United States

Biography

Catherine Fuller is a sixth grade teacher at 'Iolani School in Honolulu. She is also a crew member on the Polynesian Voyaging Society's canoes Hõkūle'a and Hikianalia, and has held multiple roles on the canoes including navigator and captain. Catherine brings the lessons from her experiences to her students through the examination of the values, practices and decisions required to create a sustainable world. Her interests include outrigger canoe paddling, photography and reading.

Linda Furuto
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States

Biography

Dr Linda Furuto is from Hau‘ula, O‘ahu and a professor of Mathematics Education at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Prior to joining UHM, Dr Furuto was an Associate Professor of Mathematics and Head of Mathematics and Science at University of Hawai’i West O‘ahu, and a middle and high school mathematics teacher in Fiji, Japan, Los Angeles, and Boston. Dr Furuto completed her PhD at UCLA, her master’s degree at Harvard University, and bachelor’s degree at Brigham Young University. She is the director of the world’s first degree program in ethnomathematics, which received an official add-a-field licensure in ethnomathematics from the Hawai‘i Teacher Standards Board. Dr Furuto has been part of the Polynesian Voyaging Society since 2007 and is an education specialist connecting voyaging on the ocean and land through ethnomathematics, access, equity, and STEM education.

Kai Hoshijo
Polynesian Voyaging Society & Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center, United States

Biography

Kai Hoshijo is 25 years old and hails from Niu Valley, Oahu. She recently received her Master’s degree from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa in Natural Resources and Environmental Management (NREM) and graduated in 2019 with her BSc in NREM. She is a navigation student and volunteer crew member with the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center. Her recent work titled “O Niu ka inoa: Management lessons based on historical timelines and community stories of a degraded nearshore resource” featured archival research and community interviews to enhance the understanding of Konohiki fishery management in Niu Ahupuaʻa. Kai loves being on the ocean and spending time near it. In her free time, she teaches, makes pottery and loves working in her yard.

Brendan Howe
Ewha Womans University, South Korea

Biography

Brendan Howe is Dean and Professor of the Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University, South Korea, where he has also served two terms as Associate Dean and Department Chair. He is also currently the President of the Asian Political and International Studies Association, and an Honorary Ambassador of Public Diplomacy and advisor for the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He has held visiting professorships and research fellowships at the East-West Center (where he is currently enjoying a second term as a POSCO Visiting Research Fellow), the Freie Universität Berlin, De La Salle University, the University of Sydney, Korea National Defence University, Georgetown University, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, and Beijing Foreign Studies University.

Educated at the University of Oxford, the University of Kent at Canterbury, Trinity College Dublin, and Georgetown University, his ongoing research agendas focus on traditional and non-traditional security in East Asia, human security, middle powers, public diplomacy, post-crisis development, comprehensive peacebuilding and conflict transformation. He has authored, co-authored, or edited around 100 related publications including Society and Democracy in South Korea and Indonesia (Palgrave, 2022), The Niche Diplomacy of Asian Middle Powers (Lexington Books, 2021), UN Governance: Peace and Human Security in Cambodia and Timor-Leste (Springer, 2020), Regional Cooperation for Peace and Development (Routledge, 2018), National Security, State Centricity, and Governance in East Asia (Springer, 2017), Peacekeeping and the Asia-Pacific (Brill, 2016), Democratic Governance in East Asia (Springer, 2015), Post-Conflict Development in East Asia (Ashgate, 2014), and The Protection and Promotion of Human Security in East Asia (Palgrave, 2013).

Haunani Kane
University of Hawai‘i, United States

Biography

Dr Haunani Hiʻilani Kane is a scientist, surfer, and voyager from Kailua, Oʻahu. An Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaiʻi, Haunani’s life is guided by the values and storied history of her kūpuna (ancestors). Haunani's research combines coastal geomorphology, paleo environmental reconstructions, spatial analysis, and the perspectives of a native islander to investigate how islands, reefs, and island people are impacted by changes in climate.

Haunani has been mentored since her youth in traditional Hawaiian wayfinding and navigation by the Polynesian Voyaging Society. Haunani has spent nearly 200 days at sea aboard both sailing and modern research vessels. As a voyager and climate scientist, Haunani's research and teaching rely upon reestablishing ancestral relationships to place. She hopes that through this process she may provide a more inclusive understanding of the impacts of environmental stressors and ensure that the best available climate science data is reflective of all stories of place and their people. Haunani is currently working with her students and colleagues at the MEGA Lab to better understand how islands in Papahānaumokuākea respond to rising sea levels and storms.

Darwin Kaneaiakala
Cultural Practitioner, United States

Biography

Darwin “Kaleolani” Kaneaiakala is a native Hawaiian cultural practitioner from the island of O’ahu. He was born, raised, and still resides in the Ahupua’a of Kāne’ohe on the Windward side. He practises Polynesian sailing, Lua (The Art of the Hawaiian Warrior), and mahi’ai (farming). Learning the art of ku’i kalo (smashing taro) from Daniel Anthony over eight years ago, he discovered the health benefits of kalo, a staple food of the Hawaiian people. He passes on his cultural knowledge by sharing food and teaching others to ku’i.

Cultural Presentation (2023) | Hawaiian Cultural Presentation: Poi Pounding
Julie Kaomea
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States

Biography

Dr Julie Kaomea is a Kanaka Maoli professor of Indigenous Education at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Throughout her youth she was fed and sustained by the ʻāina momona of Heʻeia, Oʻahu, and her deep aloha for this ʻāina continues to inform and inspire her scholarship and teaching to this day. Dr Kaomea received her bachelor’s degree at Stanford University, an elementary teaching credential at the University of California, Berkeley, and both her master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Her research in Native Hawaiian Education has been published in Educational Researcher, Curriculum Inquiry, Anthropology & Education Quarterly, Qualitative Inquiry, and History of Education Quarterly. She has served as the coordinator of the University of Hawaiʻi’s PhD in Education Program in Curriculum & Instruction for ten years, and teaches graduate courses in Decolonizing Research Methodologies, Indigenous & Postcolonial Perspectives in Education, and Contemporary Native Hawaiian Education.

Randy Kosaki
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States

Biography

Dr Randy Kosaki is a coral reef fish ecologist with NOAA's Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Born and raised on O’ahu, Kosaki received his BA in Marine Biology from Occidental College, and his PhD in Zoology from the University of Hawai‘i. Kosaki's research specialisation is in the use of advanced dive technologies, such as closed-circuit rebreathers, to explore the coral reef "twilight zone," or mesophotic (deep) coral reefs between 150 and 330 feet deep. His research is primarily focused on the remote reefs of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, but has taken him to numerous localities across the tropical Pacific. In his spare time, Kosaki enjoys reading about fish, looking at fish, photographing fish, catching fish, cooking fish, and eating fish (while watching old Broadway musicals).

Paul McKimmy
University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, United States

Biography

Paul McKimmy is interim Associate Vice Provost for Academic Excellence at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa where he leads the tenure and promotion process, co-chairs the distance learning advisory committee, reviews policy and contract cases, and coordinates professional development for faculty.

Dr McKimmy has a combined thirty years of experience in higher education, including twenty years with the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa College of Education. As the College’s Director of Technology & Distance Programs, his roles included planning and managing instructional support services, technical services, and development of distance programs. As a faculty member in the Learning Design & Technology department, he also developed curriculum and taught courses in instructional design, academic technology, and online learning. He continues to serve on doctoral committees with the department.

Dr McKimmy holds a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Western Michigan University, Master's degrees in College Student Personnel and Guidance and Counseling from Bowling Green State University, and a Bachelor's in Business Administration from Hope College.

Kanoe Morishige
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States

Biography

Born and raised in Kapahulu on Oʻahu, Kanoe Morishige is the Native Hawaiian Program Specialist and NOAA Affiliate for Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument supporting Native Hawaiian advocacy and engagement across research, policy, and management to guide the co-management of PMNM. For the past fourteen years through her work in the Native Hawaiian non-profit organisation, Nā Maka Onaona, she has been working alongside local communities perpetuating Native Hawaiian knowledge systems, integrating western scientific tools, and building capacity of youth leadership to support ʻāina momona, healthy and productive lands, oceans, and communities.