IICEHawaii2017


Conference Theme: “Educating for Change”

January 8–10, 2017 | The Hawai'i Convention Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

Why are we in teaching and learning if not to be able to help enrich the lives of our students? Educational institutions at all levels, and of all types, should continue to strive for social change in today’s world. Beyond the apparent simplicity of our conference theme, however, there is great scope for wide-ranging responses to the question of just how we go about educating for change, through examination of the inherent challenges and responsibilities faced by educators the world over.

Education, too frequently, is the victim of politics, and, worse, sometimes ideologies. Politicians and bureaucrats devise and implement policies to effect change that range from curriculum structure and goals to manipulating budgets on behalf of interest groups and their lobbyists. Questions relating to accountability, transparent governance and community relations are too frequently avoided.

Within the classroom itself, bridging the gap between policy, theory and practice, whether traditional or virtual, teachers and professors de facto become, at varying levels, agents for change. Beyond providing students with resources for study in given fields, they also support them by often being seen as acting not merely as mentors, but also as role models.

These issues are part of the global transformation affecting all human civilisation. How can we as teachers function effectively in a very uncertain environment? How do we help to equip our students with the intellectual and existential tools they require? How do we narrow the gap between theory and practice? How do we make decisions about curriculum and course context in the face of political pressure and social norms? What is the role of interdisciplinary studies in educating for change? And, at the macro level, how can we stimulate awareness of issues such as education assisting the promotion of social justice?

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Programme

  • Pacific Ethnomathematics: Navigating Ancient Wisdom and Modern Connections
    Pacific Ethnomathematics: Navigating Ancient Wisdom and Modern Connections
    Keynote Presentation: Dr Linda Furuto
  • Educating for Change: Challenging and Preserving Traditional Cultures
    Educating for Change: Challenging and Preserving Traditional Cultures
    Feature Panel Presentation: Professor Curtis Ho, Professor Ted O’Neill & Dr Joseph Haldane
  • Aloha as a Way of Being: Hawaiian Perspectives on Learning
    Aloha as a Way of Being: Hawaiian Perspectives on Learning
    Panellists: Uncle Bruce Keaulani, Dr Michael Salzman, Aunty Kehaulani Lum, and Dr Xu Di
  • Bringing Global Stories Into the Classroom Through OER and MOOCs
    Bringing Global Stories Into the Classroom Through OER and MOOCs
  • Developing and implementing an English for Specific Purposes syllabus for business majors in Japan
    Developing and implementing an English for Specific Purposes syllabus for business majors in Japan
    Featured Presentation: Professor Ken Urano
  • Doing Interdisciplinary Research and Publishing
    Doing Interdisciplinary Research and Publishing
    Featured Presentation: Dr Amanda Müller
  • Teaching Japanese Across Borders: An Original Intercultural Approach
    Teaching Japanese Across Borders: An Original Intercultural Approach
    Partner Presentation: Professor Ljiljana Markovic & Professor Biljana Djoric Francuski

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Speakers

  • Dr Linda Furuto
    Dr Linda Furuto
    University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA
  • Dr Amanda Müller
    Dr Amanda Müller
    Flinders University, Australia
  • Dr Kristin Palmer
    Dr Kristin Palmer
    University of Virginia, USA
  • Professor Ken Urano
    Professor Ken Urano
    Hokkai-Gakuen University, Japan
  • Professor Michael B. Salzman
    Professor Michael B. Salzman
    University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA
  • Uncle Bruce Yoshio Keaulani
    Uncle Bruce Yoshio Keaulani
    Living Life Source Foundation
  • Aunty Kehaulani Lum
    Aunty Kehaulani Lum
    Living Life Source Foundation
  • Professor Curtis Ho
    Professor Curtis Ho
    University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA
  • Dr Xu Di
    Dr Xu Di
    University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA
  • Professor Ted O’Neill
    Professor Ted O’Neill
    Gakushuin University, Japan

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Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The IAFOR International Conference on Education – Hawaii (IICEHawaii) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, etc.; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and oversee the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Professor Barbara Lockee
    Professor Barbara Lockee
    Virginia Tech, USA
  • Professor Curtis Ho
    Professor Curtis Ho
    University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA
  • Professor Sue Jackson
    Professor Sue Jackson
    Birkbeck, University of London, UK
  • Dr Joseph Haldane
    Dr Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Professor Steve Cornwell
    Professor Steve Cornwell
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
  • Professor Ted O’Neill
    Professor Ted O’Neill
    Gakushuin University, Japan
  • Kiyoshi Mana
    Kiyoshi Mana
    Director of International Operations, IAFOR

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Pacific Ethnomathematics: Navigating Ancient Wisdom and Modern Connections
Keynote Presentation: Dr Linda Furuto

In an effort to address issues of equitable and quality mathematics education, culturally-responsive strategies are explored in diverse populations through research and praxis. Defined as the intersection of historical traditions, sociocultural roots, linguistics, and mathematics, ethnomathematics encourages the investigation and adaptation of these concepts within formal and informal environments (D’Ambrosio, 2001; Greer, Mukhodpadhyay, Powell, & Nelson-Barber, 2009). Ethnomathematics is a tool to foster an ongoing process of navigating and wayfinding by: (1) respecting and celebrating cultural systems and practices in experiential, place-based education, (2) strengthening student engagement pathways through multiple approaches to learning mathematics, and (3) providing a framework for sustainable campus-community networks (Boaler, 2002; Palhares & Shirley, 2012).

Promising practices include a National Science Foundation funded Mathematics Center, University of Hawai‘i Ethnomathematics and STEM Institute, and local and global partnerships. The Polynesian Voyaging Society canoe Hōkūle‘a, “star of gladness”, is a vehicle to explore ethnomathematics applications as we strive to honor ancient wisdom and modern connections. For example, Hōkūle‘a is internationally renowned for the role it has played in rekindling the Pacific Island traditions of non-instrument wayfinding, astronomy, marine science, and celestial navigation (i.e., sun, moon, stars, winds) based in mathematics principles. In the past four decades, Hōkūle‘a has sailed over 150,000 nautical miles, and inspired a revival of voyaging and indigenous practices around the world (Finney, Kilsonky, Somsen, & Stroup, 1986; Furuto, 2014). Hōkūle‘a is currently circumnavigating the globe from 2013-2017 on the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, and the presenter is grateful to have been on the first international leg from Hawaiʻi to Tahiti, and subsequent voyages to American and Western Samoa, Olohega (Swain’s Island), Aotearoa (New Zealand), South Africa, Washington, D.C., and New York City, sailing with leaders such as United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, and Archbishop Desmond Mpilo Tutu. The mission of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage of Hōkūle‘a is to care for all people and places like they are ‘ohana’ (family). It is a culture of caring for our students, schools, and home that we call island earth.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Educating for Change: Challenging and Preserving Traditional Cultures
Feature Panel Presentation: Professor Curtis Ho, Professor Ted O’Neill & Dr Joseph Haldane

Chair: Dr Joseph Haldane
Panellists: Professor Curtis Ho & Professor Ted O’Neill

This interdisciplinary panel will discuss how we educate for positive change, striking a balance between the need to challenge while also respect and preserve local and indigenous cultures and their languages. The panelists will draw on their backgrounds in general education, language learning, and educational technology to discuss how policymakers and teachers deal with the often conflicting goals and inherent difficulties involved in educating for change by drawing on examples from both the local Hawaiian experience, as well as comparing and contrasting from different educational systems from around the world.

This panel will include extracts from “The Greatest Gift”, a short documentary produced by IAFOR in association with the HOPE International Development Agency, Japan and which features the Pamulaan Center for Indigenous Peoples Education in Davao, Philippines. The Pamulaan Center’s mission is focused on providing indigenous youth with scholarships to university with the expectation that those recipients return to their communities and guide the next generation of IP youth thus creating a sustainable education cycle.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Aloha as a Way of Being: Hawaiian Perspectives on Learning
Panellists: Uncle Bruce Keaulani, Dr Michael Salzman, Aunty Kehaulani Lum, and Dr Xu Di

Cultures address essential human needs both psychological, physiological, and spiritually. As indigenous peoples have been traumatized and suffered much as a result of contact with colonizers, there have been concerted efforts toward cultural reconstruction and recovery throughout the indigenous world. The first presenter will offer a context for understanding the cultural disruption and subsequent efforts to recover one’s culture.

Sharing the Hawaiian philosophy of aloha, the two panelists illustrate through the use of Hawaiian chant (oli), dance (hula), and healing as holistic, interactive ways of teaching and learning. These exemplify the possibilities for cultural revitalization in the 21st century. The audience will be invited to engage in an open discussion about the implications for an enriched way of understanding and being that rests upon the Hawaiian notion of Aloha, creating wellbeing for all.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Bringing Global Stories Into the Classroom Through OER and MOOCs

Does your institution believe it is important to provide global experiences to the students and faculty? This session will walk through different examples at the University of Virginia (UVa) of how global perspectives were brought into the classroom through the use of open educational resources (OER) and massive open online courses (MOOCs). Examples will illustrate how engaging with students in Sub-Saharan Africa helped one set of faculty broaden and deepen their understanding of business in emerging economies. Another example will illustrate lessons learned by students who were required to participate in a MOOC discussion forum as part of their course grade. These students had many learning moments that were not anticipated, such as what to do when you say something inaccurate to millions of people. A final example will be using online courses to provide educational experiences to UVa students studying abroad and designing these courses to imbue a sense of place connecting the students back to UVa while abroad.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Developing and implementing an English for Specific Purposes syllabus for business majors in Japan
Featured Presentation: Professor Ken Urano

English is a compulsory subject in secondary education in Japan, but most students, as well as teachers, do not have a clear goal for learning it because the number of people who actually need English in their lives is rather small. However, there is a certain demand for training of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) in such fields as engineering, medicine, and business, where communication in English is sometimes unavoidable. Such a demand is best accommodated at universities and colleges where the curriculum is set to help students develop skills to work in certain professions. In this talk I will first provide an overview of research and practice in ESP in Japan. I will then share my own experience as a teacher and curriculum developer at my workplace, where students learn English for business purposes.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Doing Interdisciplinary Research and Publishing
Featured Presentation: Dr Amanda Müller

Dr Müller will discuss practical strategies for conducting interdisciplinary research and publishing in reputable journals. She will provide examples of the lessons learned from her own journey thus far, both positive and negative. Dr Müller will give her own key principles about forming effective research teams, and then discuss how to go about choosing an appropriate outlet to disseminate research findings. Following on from the main presentation, a hands-on workshop will help members to identify their own individual strengths (such as the skill sets they can bring to a research project and team) and discover their own opportunities for future research.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Teaching Japanese Across Borders: An Original Intercultural Approach
Partner Presentation: Professor Ljiljana Markovic & Professor Biljana Djoric Francuski

The goal of this paper is to present to the international academic public a unique and original book for teaching Japanese, the first of its kind in Serbia. However, its significance is not limited only to the students of Japanese in Serbia, because this manual can be a source of ideas for teachers of Japanese in any other culture as well. The main feature that makes it so outstanding is the use of mnemonic methods for learning how to read and write the Japanese characters kanji, which has been done before in some Western countries, but in a different way. Namely, though the possibility of using mnemonic devices for memorising kanji by connecting them with information that can be remembered more easily has already been recognized, the Serbian authors applied extremely inventive and creative forms in order to connect the Japanese and Serbian cultures, thus rendering the process of learning more entertaining and interesting, and making it much easier for the student. Not only did authors include some kanji that are not usually explained with mnemonics, but they also found explanations which are not typical for the common ones, such as comparing number nine (九) with a cat which has nine lives, or number four (四) with two lips plus two rows of teeth. The most original mnemonic is certainly the adjective “small” (小) which, according to them, represents a young bird hatching from an egg.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Dr Linda Furuto
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Biography

Dr Linda H. L. Furuto was born and raised in Hau‘ula on the North Shore of O‘ahu, Hawaii. She is an Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa College of Education. Prior to joining the UHM, Dr Furuto was an Associate Professor of Mathematics, Head of Mathematics and Science, and Founder of the Mathematics Center at the University of Hawai‘i – West O‘ahu. Dr Furuto completed her PhD at the University of California, Los Angeles, received her Master’s degree from Harvard University, and her Bachelor’s degree from BYU. Her research interests include quantitative research methodology, ethnomathematics, and educational access and equity. Over the past 15 years, Dr Furuto has been a Visiting Scholar of Mathematics at the University of Tokyo, worked with students in the Boston public school system as a research-practitioner in Harvard University’s “Inventing the Future” project, taught mathematics and music at the Technical College in Suva, Fiji, collaborated with the East-West Center and Ministry of Education of Vietnam on the International Forum for Education 2020 initiative, and helped to design educational programs with the Polynesian Voyaging Society. In addition, Dr Furuto has researched and consulted at the East-West Center, US Department of State, UCLA Center for International and Development Education, and Pacific Resources for Education and Learning. She received the Pacific Business News’ Top Forty Under 40 Award in 2010, the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents Frances Davis Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2011, University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents Medal for Excellence in Teaching in 2012, and was featured on PBS Hawai‘i’s Long Story Short in 2016. She is humbled to be engaged in the 2013-2017 Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage on the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe to collectively care for our planet through island wisdom and global connections.

Keynote Presentation: Pacific Ethnomathematics: Navigating Ancient Wisdom and Modern Connections

Dr Amanda Müller
Flinders University, Australia

Biography

Dr Müller is a Senior Lecturer at Flinders University where she teaches English for Specific Purposes. Among her achievements are: reaching the top three finalists for a national award for innovative work in nursing; being an invited speaker on language testing and then on clinical communication; acting as a consultant for multicultural aged care support; receiving two international quality badges for her computer games; gaining a Faculty Teaching Excellence award; being the recipient of the university’s Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Early Career Researchers. Dr Müller is currently under consideration for a national Research Council Discovery Award and has been involved in eight successful research grants.

Dr Müller has worked in many multidisciplinary research groups and published on a diverse range of topics, including simulation-based learning, English language testing and policy, nursing English, computer assisted language learning, teaching kanji, academic English, teaching psychomotor skills in ultrasound, higher education, childbirth, English dialects, phonological awareness, and nursing registration policy. Her articles have appeared in top international journals, such as the International Journal of Nursing Studies, Medical Teacher, and Women and Birth, and important Australian journals, such as Higher Education Research & Development and the Internal Journal of Pedagogies and Learning. She has produced a number of book chapters and two books, A Glasgow Voice, on Scottish literary language, and U2Uni: Personal tools for success (Custom Edition), which deals with academic literacy. She also has a number of conference publications. She is constantly looking for new opportunities to conduct and disseminate research.

Featured Presentation: Doing Interdisciplinary Research and Publishing

Dr Kristin Palmer
University of Virginia, USA

Biography

Dr Kristin Palmer is the Director of Online Learning Programs at the University of Virginia (UVa). In this role, she is responsible for open educational resources, facilitating the assessment and fulfilment of pan-university e-learning needs, and conducting research. She represents UVa on the Networked Learning Collaborative of Virginia (NLCVa), she is a co-chair of the Online Education Advisory Committee, and is a member of the Accessibility Task Force and the President’s Strategic Planning Steering Committee. She co-created and is on the Advisory Board for the annual Innovation in Pedagogy Summit at UVa.

Prior to UVa, Dr Palmer worked in both education and business on complex technology projects. She has worked at Hewlett-Packard, eBay, Intuit, and Disney.

Featured Presentation: Bringing Global Stories Into the Classroom Through OER and MOOCs

Professor Ken Urano
Hokkai-Gakuen University, Japan

Biography

Ken Urano is a professor at the Faculty of Business Administration, Hokkai-Gakuen University, in Sapporo, Japan, where he mainly teaches English to business students. He is also a visiting professor on the Graduate Program in Foreign Languages, Nagoya Gakuin University, where he supervises master’s students in English. His research interests include second language acquisition (SLA), especially acquisition of morphology and syntax, research methodology in SLA, task-based language teaching, English for specific purposes, and computer-assisted language learning.

Featured Presentation: Developing and implementing an English for Specific Purposes syllabus for business majors in Japan

Professor Michael B. Salzman
University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA

Biography

Michael B. Salzman is a professor and Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He is a licensed psychologist and has published in the areas of cross-cultural psychology, cultural psychology, intercultural conflict, intercultural sensitivity training, multicultural counseling and cultural trauma and recovery among indigenous peoples and the effects of globalization on culture and anxiety. He has worked with diverse populations as a teacher, clinician and researcher in urban and rural settings and has been at UH since 1997. He recently contributed a chapter entitled “Ethnocultural Conflict and Cooperation in Hawaii” in the Handbook of Ethnic Conflict: International Perspectives and a chapter in the just published Internalized Oppression: The Psychology of Marginalized Groups.

Featured Panel Presentation: Aloha as a Way of Being: Hawaiian Perspectives on Learning

Uncle Bruce Yoshio Keaulani
Living Life Source Foundation

Biography

Bruce Yoshio Keaulani was born and raised in Waikiki, one of two sons of “Ox” Keaulani, a beachboy who surfed with Duke Kahanamoku, and Janet Kaneda Keaulani, the daughter of a Buddhist priest from Niigata Prefecture. His genealogy traces back to the heavens, through the union of his ancestors, Paiea and Kuahilanimaka. Uncle Bruce is the CEO and Kahu of Living Life Source Foundation, in Pu`ulena, Mānoa, and Professor of Kaito Gakko, a school of peace martial arts, where he carries the lineage of Doctor Kaito, Uncle David Nuuhiwa.

Uncle Bruce was taken at age 5, by his father, to study the teachings of peace martial arts and healing with Seishiro “Henry” Okazaki, and later, was selected to carry his family’s practice of Hawaiian martial arts. He credits his teacher, Aunty Mornnah Simeona, for enlightening him with the practices of ho`oponopono, lomilomi, laau lapaau and laau kahea.

A father, grandfather and great-grandfather, he has worked with youth of all ages, and their families for over 40 years, as a coach, kumu, Sensei, and traditional healer. Uncle Bruce has a deep concern for the needs of homeless youth and families, especially, in the Ahupuaa of Waikiki, and sustains a nurturing and safe Kauhale, a Native Hawaiian traditional system of living, where peace and Aloha is honored.

Featured Panel Presentation: Aloha as a Way of Being: Hawaiian Perspectives on Learning

Aunty Kehaulani Lum
Living Life Source Foundation

Biography

Aloha. I am Kehaulani Lum from Aiea, Oahu. Mahalo nui loa for the opportunity to serve the youth and families of Hawai`i Nei. My paternal family ties are to Nanakawaaokeoua, of Kawaihae, Hawaii, Kapou of Wailea, Hawaii, Waiehu of Waipio, Hawaii, Helela of Anahulu, Oahu, Kailiahi and Akana of Aiea, Oahu, Hulilani of Mokuoeo, Oahu, and Lum of Kalihi, Oahu. My maternal family ties connect to Taua of Hana and Lahaina, Hubbell of Makawao and Pukalani, Keawe and Haia of Hana, and Keanu of Wailuku.

Beyond the islands of Hawaii Nei, my familial lineage traverses the great oceans and continents, to Matapuupuu, chief priest of Huahine and advisor to Keopuolani, Huangdi, the Yellow Emperor of China (2697 BC), Bi Gan, advisor to the last Emperor of the Shang Dynasty, Wilhelm of Weissach, Württemberg, Germany, Hubball of Worcestershire, England, and the O’Sullivan Bear Clan.

As the eldest grandchild of my family in both lines, I was prepared since age 5 for a lifetime of service to humanity, especially, in the realms of Native Hawaiian cultural and historic preservation, economic development, education, natural resource restoration, spirituality, and social development. I appear today as the Board Secretary of Living Life Source Foundation and a student of Uncle Bruce Keaulani.

Featured Panel Presentation: Aloha as a Way of Being: Hawaiian Perspectives on Learning

Professor Curtis Ho
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Biography

Curtis Ho is Professor, Department Chair and Graduate Chair of the Learning Design and Technology department at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. He has been a UH faculty member for over 30 years, teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in educational media research, interactive multimedia, web-based instruction, distance education, video technology, and computer-based education. He has taught courses in American and Western Samoa and Saipan, and was the first to offer a course statewide over the Hawai’i Interactive Television System.

Curtis Ho received his PhD in Educational Technology from Arizona State University where he served as instructional designer. He has consulted for public and private schools, financial institutions, and higher education. For several years he directed the Office of Faculty Development and Academic Support for the University of Hawaii’s Manoa campus. He has presented extensively at national and international conferences at locations including Beijing, Copenhagen, Eskisehir, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Lugano, Rome, Kumamoto, Kyoto, Melbourne, Montreal, Osaka, Panang, Taipei, Takamatsu, Tokyo, Toronto, and Vancouver.

Professor Ho was a Principal Investigator, Co-Principal Investigator and Project Director for three US Department of Education grants totalling over 9.8 million US dollars. He is a co-organiser of TCC Worldwide Online Conference, an executive committee member of E-Learn, Association for the Advancement of Computers in Education, and is also past-President of the Pan Pacific Distance Learning Association, a chapter of the United States Distance Learning Association and of the Pacific Association for Communications and Technology, a chapter of the national Association for Educational Communications and Technology.


Previous IICEHawaii Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Educating for Change: Challenging and Preserving Traditional Cultures

Dr Xu Di
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Biography

Xu Di (许笛) is a professor in the department of Education Foundations, College of Education, University of Hawai’i-Mānoa. She is a member of the board of examiners for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE, now Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation [CAEP]), which has provided national accreditation for teacher education programs in the United States since 2007. Her recent publications focus on bridging Eastern and Western philosophy for educational practices and include Chinese Philosophy on Teaching & Learning: Xueji《学记》 in the Twenty-First Century (2016), The Wisdom from the East: A Holistic Theory and Practice of Health and Wellness (2013), Spiritual Heritage and Education Today (2013), Taoism: Origin, Essence, and Practice (2013), and A Reading of Lao Zi for Educational Philosophers Today (2012). In addition, she published A Comparison of the Educational Ideas and Practices of John Dewey and Mao Zedong in China (1992) and various chapters and articles on teacher education, educational foundations, multicultural education, international education, and ESL education. She worked as an international consultant in teacher education and educational reforms in Central Asia and Africa for the World Bank in 2002 and 2001. She served on the Hawai’i Teacher Standard Board (2005–2008) and as the president of the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) Hawai’i Chapter as well as Hawai’i state representative (2006–2008). She was a visiting scholar and research associate at the Philosophy of Educational Research Center at Harvard University (1999–2000), a visiting professor in Peking University (2015, 2011, 2009, and 1997) and in Renmin University (2012, 2014, and 2016), and an exchange professor at National Kaohsiung University in Taiwan (1998). She served as manuscript editor as well as editorial board member for Harvard Educational Review during 1988–1990. She was honored in Who’s Who among American Teachers in 1996, 1998, 2000, 2001, and 2008.

Featured Presentation | TBA

Previous IICEHawaii Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Aloha as a Way of Being: Hawaiian Perspectives on Learning

Professor Ted O’Neill
Gakushuin University, Japan

Biography

Ted O’Neill is a professor at Gakushuin University, Tokyo, in the Faculty of International Social Sciences. He previously taught at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and J. F. Oberlin University. Ted was co-editor of The Language Teacher for the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT) and later served on the JALT National Board of Directors as Director of Public Relations from 2012 to 2016. He received an MA in ESL and Bilingual Education from the University of Massachusetts/Boston, USA in 1996 and completed a postgraduate Certificate of Educational Technology and Information Literacy through the Graduate School of Education at the State University of New York in 2014. He is a part of a research group studying implementation of content-based language education and content and language integrated learning in East and Southeast Asia with the generous support of The Research Institute for Oriental Cul­tures at Gakushuin University.​

Professor Ted O’Neill is a Vice-President (at large) of IAFOR. He is a member of the Educational Technology section of the International Academic Advisory Board.


Previous IICEHawaii Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Educating for Change: Challenging and Preserving Traditional Cultures

Professor Barbara Lockee
Virginia Tech, USA

Biography

Dr Lockee is Professor of Instructional Design and Technology at Virginia Tech, USA, where she is also Associate Director of the School of Education and Associate Director of Educational Research and Outreach. She teaches courses in instructional design, message design, and distance education. Her research interests focus on instructional design issues related to technology-mediated learning. She has published more than 80 papers in academic journals, conferences and books, and has presented her scholarly work at over 90 national and international conferences.

Dr Lockee is Immediate Past President of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, an international professional organisation for educational technology researchers and practitioners. She earned her PhD in 1996 from Virginia Tech in Curriculum and Instruction (Instructional Technology), M.A. in 1991 from Appalachian State University in Curriculum and Instruction (Educational Media), and BA in 1986 from Appalachian State University in Communication Arts.

Professor Curtis Ho
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA

Biography

Curtis Ho is Professor, Department Chair and Graduate Chair of the Learning Design and Technology department at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. He has been a UH faculty member for over 30 years, teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in educational media research, interactive multimedia, web-based instruction, distance education, video technology, and computer-based education. He has taught courses in American and Western Samoa and Saipan, and was the first to offer a course statewide over the Hawai’i Interactive Television System.

Curtis Ho received his PhD in Educational Technology from Arizona State University where he served as instructional designer. He has consulted for public and private schools, financial institutions, and higher education. For several years he directed the Office of Faculty Development and Academic Support for the University of Hawaii’s Manoa campus. He has presented extensively at national and international conferences at locations including Beijing, Copenhagen, Eskisehir, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Lugano, Rome, Kumamoto, Kyoto, Melbourne, Montreal, Osaka, Panang, Taipei, Takamatsu, Tokyo, Toronto, and Vancouver.

Professor Ho was a Principal Investigator, Co-Principal Investigator and Project Director for three US Department of Education grants totalling over 9.8 million US dollars. He is a co-organiser of TCC Worldwide Online Conference, an executive committee member of E-Learn, Association for the Advancement of Computers in Education, and is also past-President of the Pan Pacific Distance Learning Association, a chapter of the United States Distance Learning Association and of the Pacific Association for Communications and Technology, a chapter of the national Association for Educational Communications and Technology.


Previous IICEHawaii Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Educating for Change: Challenging and Preserving Traditional Cultures

Professor Sue Jackson
Birkbeck, University of London, UK

Biography

Sue Jackson is Professor Emeritus at Birkbeck, University of London. She was previously Pro-Vice-Master (Vice President) for Learning and Teaching, Professor of Lifelong Learning and Gender and Director of Birkbeck Institute for Lifelong Learning at Birkbeck. She publishes widely in the field of gender and lifelong learning, with a particular focus on identities.

Sue's recent publications include Innovations in Lifelong Learning: Critical Perspectives on Diversity, Participation and Vocational Learning (Routledge, 2011); Gendered Choices: Learning, Work, Identities in Lifelong Learning (Springer, 2011, with Irene Malcolm and Kate Thomas); and Lifelong Learning and Social Justice (NIACE, 2011).

Dr Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and a Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within the university.

He is also a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

A black belt in judo, he is married with two children, and lives in Japan.

Professor Steve Cornwell
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan

Biography

Steve Cornwell is the President of IAFOR, and President of the Academic Governing Board. He coordinates and oversees the International Academic Advisory Board, and also serves on the organization's Board of Directors.

Dr Cornwell is Professor of English and Interdisciplinary Studies at Osaka Jogakuin University, and also teaches in the online portion of the MA TESOL Programme for the New School in New York. He helped write and design several of the New School courses and has been involved with the programme since its inception.

He has also been involved with the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), (an affiliate of IAFOR) serving on its National Board of Directors as Director of Programme from 2012-2016; where his duties involved working with a volunteer team of 50+ to put on JALT’s annual, international conference each autumn.

Most recently, since 2012, he has been the Committee Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s Lifelong Learning Committee and is responsible for their evening extension Programme geared towards alumni and community members. He is also the Vice-Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s English Education Committee which is responsible for suggesting policy regarding English Education and also responsible for developing material for the integrated curriculum.

Professor Ted O’Neill
Gakushuin University, Japan

Biography

Ted O’Neill is a professor at Gakushuin University, Tokyo, in the Faculty of International Social Sciences. He previously taught at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and J. F. Oberlin University. Ted was co-editor of The Language Teacher for the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT) and later served on the JALT National Board of Directors as Director of Public Relations from 2012 to 2016. He received an MA in ESL and Bilingual Education from the University of Massachusetts/Boston, USA in 1996 and completed a postgraduate Certificate of Educational Technology and Information Literacy through the Graduate School of Education at the State University of New York in 2014. He is a part of a research group studying implementation of content-based language education and content and language integrated learning in East and Southeast Asia with the generous support of The Research Institute for Oriental Cul­tures at Gakushuin University.​

Professor Ted O’Neill is a Vice-President (at large) of IAFOR. He is a member of the Educational Technology section of the International Academic Advisory Board.


Previous IICEHawaii Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Educating for Change: Challenging and Preserving Traditional Cultures

Kiyoshi Mana
Director of International Operations, IAFOR

Biography

Kiyoshi Mana is the Director of International Operations, and is responsible for overseeing the global operations of the organisation, including IAFOR's conferences in Asia, Europe, North America and the Middle East. He is also the Vice President for Global Partnerships and Affiliations, developing our expanding relationships with universities and organisations around the world.

An American of Japanese descent, Kiyoshi has long been fascinated by the country of his ancestors, studying both Japanese language and culture at San Francisco State, and also successfully training to be a sushi chef. Coming from a family of educators, he came to Japan in 2009 to continue his studies and to teach, before joining IAFOR in 2011 in a position that utilizes his marketing experience, and his strong commitment to education.