IICE2023 Overview


Join us in Honolulu for IICE2023!

January 05–08, 2023 | The Hawai'i Convention Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States

Aloha and welcome to the beautiful island of Oahu, home to The IAFOR International Conference on Education in Hawaii (IICE), and The IAFOR International Conference on Arts & Humanities in Hawaii (IICAH).

Held in partnership with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, this international conference encourages academics and scholars to meet and exchange ideas and views in a forum stimulating respectful dialogue, by bringing together university scholars working throughout Hawai'i, the United States, Asia, and beyond to share ideas and research at the intersection of education, and the arts and humanities. This event will afford an exceptional opportunity for renewing old acquaintances, making new contacts, networking, and facilitating partnerships across national and disciplinary borders.

Since its founding in 2009, IAFOR has brought people and ideas together in a variety of events and platforms to promote and celebrate interdisciplinary study, and underline its importance. Over the past year we have engaged in many cross-sectoral projects, including those with universities (the University of Barcelona, Hofstra University, UCL, University of Belgrade and Moscow State University), think tanks (the East-West Center), as well as collaborative projects with the United Nations in New York, and the Government of Japan through the Prime Minister’s office, and right here in Honolulu with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa for this conference!

With the IAFOR Research Centre at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, we have engaged in a number of interdisciplinary initiatives we believe will have an important impact on domestic and international public policy conversations. It is through conferences like these that we expand our network and partners, and we have no doubt that IICE2023 and IICAH2023 will offer a remarkable opportunity for the sharing of research and best practice, for the meeting of people and ideas. We expect the resultant professional and personal collaborations to endure for many years, and we look forward to seeing you in Honolulu!

The 8th IAFOR International Conference on Education in Hawaii (IICE2023) will be held alongside The IAFOR International Conference on Arts & Humanities in Hawaii (IICAH2023), and many of the sessions will concentrate on areas at the intersection of education and the arts and humanities. In keeping with IAFOR’s commitment to interdisciplinary study, delegates at either conference are encouraged to attend sessions in other disciplines. Registration for either conference will allow delegates to attend sessions in the other.

– The IICE2023 Programme Committee


IAFOR Journal of Education (Scopus Indexed Journal)

This conference is associated with the Scopus and DOAJ listed IAFOR Journal of Education.
 

Key Information

*Submit early to take advantage of the discounted registration rates. Learn more about our registration options.

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Plenary Speakers

  • Pelika Andrade
    Pelika Andrade
    Na Maka Onaona & University of Hawaiʻi, United States
  • Chris Blake
    Chris Blake
    Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States
  • Mark K. Ellis
    Mark K. Ellis
    Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States
  • Catherine Fuller
    Catherine Fuller
    Polynesian Voyaging Society, Hawai'i, United States
  • Linda Furuto
    Linda Furuto
    University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States
  • Kai Hoshijo
    Kai Hoshijo
    Polynesian Voyaging Society & Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center, United States
  • Brendan Howe
    Brendan Howe
    Ewha Womans University, South Korea
  • Haunani Kane
    Haunani Kane
    University of Hawai‘i, United States
  • Darwin Kaneaiakala
    Darwin Kaneaiakala
    Cultural Practitioner, United States
  • Julie Kaomea
    Julie Kaomea
    University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States
  • Randy Kosaki
    Randy Kosaki
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States
  • Paul McKimmy
    Paul McKimmy
    University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, United States
  • Kanoe Morishige
    Kanoe Morishige
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States

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Programme

  • Hindsight, Foresight, and Our Post-COVID Future
    Hindsight, Foresight, and Our Post-COVID Future
    Keynote Presentation: Paul McKimmy
  • Internationalisation and Cooperation in East Asian Higher Education
    Internationalisation and Cooperation in East Asian Higher Education
    Keynote Presentation: Brendan Howe
  • Hidden Hawaiʻi: A Huakaʻi through the Native Realities of Our Island Home
    Hidden Hawaiʻi: A Huakaʻi through the Native Realities of Our Island Home
    Keynote Presentation: Julie Kaomea
  • Weaving Knowledge Systems and Nurturing the Next Generation to Care for Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
    Weaving Knowledge Systems and Nurturing the Next Generation to Care for Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
    Panel Presentation: Pelika Andrade, Kai Hoshijo, Haunani Kāne, Randall Kosaki, Kanoe Morishige
  • Voyaging: From the Canoe to the Classroom
    Voyaging: From the Canoe to the Classroom
    Panel Presentation: Chris Blake, Mark K. Ellis, Catherine Fuller, Linda Furuto
  • Hawaiian Cultural Presentation: Poi Pounding
    Hawaiian Cultural Presentation: Poi Pounding
    Cultural Presentation: Darwin Kaneaiakala

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Conference Committees

Global Programme Committee

Dr Joseph Haldane, Chairman and CEO, IAFOR
His Excellency Professor Toshiya Hoshino, Osaka University, Japan
Professor Barbara Lockee, Virginia Tech., United States
Professor Donald E. Hall, Binghamton University, United States
Dr James W. McNally, University of Michigan, United States & NACDA Program on Aging
Professor Haruko Satoh, Osaka University, Japan
Dr Grant Black, Chuo University, Japan
Professor Dexter Da Silva, Keisen University, Japan
Professor Gary Swanson, University of Northern Colorado, United States
Professor Baden Offord, Curtin University, Australia
Professor Frank Ravitch, Michigan State University, United States
Professor William Baber, Kyoto University, Japan

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Conference Programme Committee

Dr Failautusi ‘Tusi’ Avegalio, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, United States
Professor Xu Di, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, United States
Dr Joseph Haldane, The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
Professor Curtis Ho, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, United States
Dr Daniel Hoffman, University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States
Professor Barbara Lockee, Virginia Tech, United States
Professor James W. McNally, University of Michigan, United States & NACDA Program on Aging
Dr Alex Means, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, United States
Professor Michael Menchaca, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, United States
Professor Deane Neubauer, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, United States
Professor Sela V. Panapasa, University of Michigan, United States
Tialei Scanlan, Brigham Young University – Hawaii, United States
Robin Watson, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, United States
Dr Hiagi M. Wesley, Brigham Young University – Hawaii, United States

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IAFOR International Academic Advisory Board

General Education Section

Professor Shingo Ashizawa, Kansai University of International Studies, Japan
Dr Tzu-Bin Lin, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
Professor David McLoughlin, Meiji University, Japan
Dr Keiichi Ogawa, Kobe University, Japan
Professor Mark Pegrum, The University of Western Australia, Australia
Dr Cynthia Northington Purdie, William Patterson University, United States
Dr Thanassis Rikakis, University of Southern California, United States
Dr Rachel Lam, Independent consultant, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Distinguished Professor Tien-Hui Chiang, Zhengzhou University, China
Dr Linda Schwartz, Ambrose University, Canada
Dr Justin Sanders, Minerva Project
Professor Svetlana Ter-Minasova, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia
Professor Joshua Mok, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
Dr Yvonne Masters, Independent Researcher, Australia
Dr Bernard Montoneri, Independent Researcher, Taiwan
Professor Haruko Satoh, Osaka University, Japan


Educational Technology Section

Professor Curtis Ho, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, United States
Professor Mark Pegrum, The University of Western Australia, Australia
Dr Thanassis Rikakis, University of Southern California, United States
Daniel Kjellsson, Future Talent Council, Sweden
Professor Barbara Lockee, Virginia Tech., United States
Professor Keith W. Miller, The University of Missouri, United States
Dr Jo Mynard, Kanda University of International Studies, Japan
Mr Matthew Kay, Nature Publishing, United Kingdom
Professor Robert Logie, Osaka Gakuin University, Japan
Dr Amanda Müller, Flinders University, Australia


Language Learning Section

Professor Kay Irie, Gakushuin University, Japan
Professor David McLoughlin, Meiji University, Japan
Dr Shamim Ali, Allama Iqbal Open University, Pakistan
Dr Christine Coombe, Dubai Men's College, United Arab Emirates
Professor Jean-Marc Dewaele, Birkbeck, University of London, United Kingdom
Professor Stephen J. Hall, Sunway University, Malaysia
Professor José McClanahan, Creighton University, United States
Professor Svetlana Ter-Minasova, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia
Dr Sufian Abu-Rmaileh, UAE University, United Arab Emirates
Professor Michiko Nakano, Waseda University, Japan
Dr Amanda Müller, Flinders University, Australia

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Conference Review Committee

Dr Balamuralithara Balakrishnan, Sultan Idris Education University, Malaysia
Professor Valentina Canese, Universidad Nacional de Asunción, Paraguay
Dr Yung-huei Chen, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan
Dr Edsoulla Chung, Hong Kong Metropolitan University, Hong Kong
Dr Joanie Crandall, Yorkville University, Canada
Dr Lorna Dimatatac, Technological Institute of the Philippines, Philippines
Professor Biljana Djoric Francuski, University of Belgrade, Serbia
Dr Rayna Fujii, University of Hawai'i Manoa, United States
Dr Stacy George, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, United States
Dr Sreeramulu Gosikonda, Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS), India
Professor Heeseon Jang, Pyeongtaek University, South Korea
Dr Erick Kong, California State University East Bay, United States
Dr Abdelaziz Mohammed, Albaha University, Saudi Arabia
Dr Matthew Motyka, University of San Francisco, United States
Dr Esther Ntuli, Idaho State University, United States
Dr Zanita Glenda Plaga, West Visayas State University, Philippines
Professor Christian Schachtner, IU University of Applied Sciences, Germany
Dr Ronnie Tiffany-Kinder, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, United States
Dr Miguel Varela, Academic Bridge Program, Qatar
Dr Yifeng Yuan, University of Technology Sydney, Australia

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Pelika Andrade
Na Maka Onaona & University of Hawaiʻi, United States

Biography

A native Hawaiian born and raised on the island of Kauaʻi, Pelika Andrade works with Na Maka Onaona, a Hawaii-based non-profit, and the University of Hawaii Sea Grant College program. She has a long history of working with Hawaiian communities throughout the archipelago as a community member, sailor, voyager, cultural practitioner and researcher.

For the past twelve years, she has been developing alternate approaches to monitoring Hawaiʻi’s watersheds and has been supporting the implementation of a management strategy that supports healthy balanced communities in Hawai‘i. She is an ongoing participant in the Papahanaumokuakea Cultural Working Group and has served as chair from 2011-2014 and interim chair 2021-present. Pelika has a Master’s degree in Hawaiian studies with a focus on Malama Aina (Hawaiian Conservation) and has visited the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands many times to conduct scientific and cultural research. "I feel both honoured and privileged to be a contributing part of caring for our islands, our elder siblings, and ensuring a healthy-thriving pae'aina (archipelago) for future generations."

Chris Blake
Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States

Biography

Chris Blake currently serves as the Director of Pacific Innovations with the Office of Teaching and Learning Innovations at Kamehameha-Kapālama. In this role, he works to examine the wisdom of our ancestors and integrate it into our present knowledge to help us to navigate into the future. Chris has been an educator in the hui ʻepekema (Science) i ke kula kiʻekiʻe ma Kamehameha-Kapālama since 2000 and has been the High School Science Department Chair since 2010. Currently, he is the kumu (teacher) of Papa Kilo Hōkū (Celestial Navigation) which takes many of the components of non-instrument traditional navigation and sailing and provides a hands-on opportunity to learn from navigators and captains from the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

Chris has been working with the Polynesian Voyaging Society since 2012, connecting with Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia with the Mālama Honua -World-Wide Voyage in 2014-2017. He has continued his growth and development with Nainoa Thompson and Bruce Blankenfield with voyages to Ka Houpo o Kāne (InterTropical Convergence Zone) in May 2021 and the voyage to Papahānaumokuākea in June 2021. In 2022, he was selected for the crew on Hōkūleʻa as it voyaged on the ancient searoad of Kealaikahiki to Arutua, Rangiroa and Papaʻete in Tahiti.

Mark K. Ellis
Polynesian Voyaging Society, United States

Biography

Mark K. Ellis was born, raised, and currently lives with his ʻohana in Nuʻuanu, Oʻahu. He is a husband and father of four children. Mark is a crew member and student of navigation with the Polynesian Voyaging Society. He is a past Fellow of the First Nations’ Futures Institute at Stanford University. Mark received an undergraduate degree in Organisational Development and a master’s degree in Instructional Technology and Design. He is currently a Sr. Instructional Designer with Kamehameha Schools.

Catherine Fuller
Polynesian Voyaging Society, Hawai'i, United States

Biography

Catherine Fuller is a sixth grade teacher at 'Iolani School in Honolulu. She is also a crew member on the Polynesian Voyaging Society's canoes Hõkūle'a and Hikianalia, and has held multiple roles on the canoes including navigator and captain. Catherine brings the lessons from her experiences to her students through the examination of the values, practices and decisions required to create a sustainable world. Her interests include outrigger canoe paddling, photography and reading.

Linda Furuto
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States

Biography

Dr Linda Furuto is from Hau‘ula, O‘ahu and a professor of Mathematics Education at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Prior to joining UHM, Dr Furuto was an Associate Professor of Mathematics and Head of Mathematics and Science at University of Hawai’i West O‘ahu, and a middle and high school mathematics teacher in Fiji, Japan, Los Angeles, and Boston. Dr Furuto completed her PhD at UCLA, her master’s degree at Harvard University, and bachelor’s degree at Brigham Young University. She is the director of the world’s first degree program in ethnomathematics, which received an official add-a-field licensure in ethnomathematics from the Hawai‘i Teacher Standards Board. Dr Furuto has been part of the Polynesian Voyaging Society since 2007 and is an education specialist connecting voyaging on the ocean and land through ethnomathematics, access, equity, and STEM education.

Kai Hoshijo
Polynesian Voyaging Society & Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center, United States

Biography

Kai Hoshijo is 25 years old and hails from Niu Valley, Oahu. She recently received her Master’s degree from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa in Natural Resources and Environmental Management (NREM) and graduated in 2019 with her BSc in NREM. She is a navigation student and volunteer crew member with the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Maunalua Fishpond Heritage Center. Her recent work titled “O Niu ka inoa: Management lessons based on historical timelines and community stories of a degraded nearshore resource” featured archival research and community interviews to enhance the understanding of Konohiki fishery management in Niu Ahupuaʻa. Kai loves being on the ocean and spending time near it. In her free time, she teaches, makes pottery and loves working in her yard.

Brendan Howe
Ewha Womans University, South Korea

Biography

Brendan Howe is Dean and Professor of the Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University, South Korea, where he has also served two terms as Associate Dean and Department Chair. He is also currently the President of the Asian Political and International Studies Association, and an Honorary Ambassador of Public Diplomacy and advisor for the Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He has held visiting professorships and research fellowships at the East-West Center (where he is currently enjoying a second term as a POSCO Visiting Research Fellow), the Freie Universität Berlin, De La Salle University, the University of Sydney, Korea National Defence University, Georgetown University, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, and Beijing Foreign Studies University.

Educated at the University of Oxford, the University of Kent at Canterbury, Trinity College Dublin, and Georgetown University, his ongoing research agendas focus on traditional and non-traditional security in East Asia, human security, middle powers, public diplomacy, post-crisis development, comprehensive peacebuilding and conflict transformation. He has authored, co-authored, or edited around 100 related publications including Society and Democracy in South Korea and Indonesia (Palgrave, 2022), The Niche Diplomacy of Asian Middle Powers (Lexington Books, 2021), UN Governance: Peace and Human Security in Cambodia and Timor-Leste (Springer, 2020), Regional Cooperation for Peace and Development (Routledge, 2018), National Security, State Centricity, and Governance in East Asia (Springer, 2017), Peacekeeping and the Asia-Pacific (Brill, 2016), Democratic Governance in East Asia (Springer, 2015), Post-Conflict Development in East Asia (Ashgate, 2014), and The Protection and Promotion of Human Security in East Asia (Palgrave, 2013).

Haunani Kane
University of Hawai‘i, United States

Biography

Dr Haunani Hiʻilani Kane is a scientist, surfer, and voyager from Kailua, Oʻahu. An Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaiʻi, Haunani’s life is guided by the values and storied history of her kūpuna (ancestors). Haunani's research combines coastal geomorphology, paleo environmental reconstructions, spatial analysis, and the perspectives of a native islander to investigate how islands, reefs, and island people are impacted by changes in climate.

Haunani has been mentored since her youth in traditional Hawaiian wayfinding and navigation by the Polynesian Voyaging Society. Haunani has spent nearly 200 days at sea aboard both sailing and modern research vessels. As a voyager and climate scientist, Haunani's research and teaching rely upon reestablishing ancestral relationships to place. She hopes that through this process she may provide a more inclusive understanding of the impacts of environmental stressors and ensure that the best available climate science data is reflective of all stories of place and their people. Haunani is currently working with her students and colleagues at the MEGA Lab to better understand how islands in Papahānaumokuākea respond to rising sea levels and storms.

Darwin Kaneaiakala
Cultural Practitioner, United States

Biography

Darwin “Kaleolani” Kaneaiakala is a native Hawaiian cultural practitioner from the island of O’ahu. He was born, raised, and still resides in the Ahupua’a of Kāne’ohe on the Windward side. He practises Polynesian sailing, Lua (The Art of the Hawaiian Warrior), and mahi’ai (farming). Learning the art of ku’i kalo (smashing taro) from Daniel Anthony over eight years ago, he discovered the health benefits of kalo, a staple food of the Hawaiian people. He passes on his cultural knowledge by sharing food and teaching others to ku’i.

Cultural Presentation (2023) | Hawaiian Cultural Presentation: Poi Pounding
Julie Kaomea
University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States

Biography

Dr Julie Kaomea is a Kanaka Maoli professor of Indigenous Education at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Throughout her youth she was fed and sustained by the ʻāina momona of Heʻeia, Oʻahu, and her deep aloha for this ʻāina continues to inform and inspire her scholarship and teaching to this day. Dr Kaomea received her bachelor’s degree at Stanford University, an elementary teaching credential at the University of California, Berkeley, and both her master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Her research in Native Hawaiian Education has been published in Educational Researcher, Curriculum Inquiry, Anthropology & Education Quarterly, Qualitative Inquiry, and History of Education Quarterly. She has served as the coordinator of the University of Hawaiʻi’s PhD in Education Program in Curriculum & Instruction for ten years, and teaches graduate courses in Decolonizing Research Methodologies, Indigenous & Postcolonial Perspectives in Education, and Contemporary Native Hawaiian Education.

Randy Kosaki
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States

Biography

Dr Randy Kosaki is a coral reef fish ecologist with NOAA's Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Born and raised on O’ahu, Kosaki received his BA in Marine Biology from Occidental College, and his PhD in Zoology from the University of Hawai‘i. Kosaki's research specialisation is in the use of advanced dive technologies, such as closed-circuit rebreathers, to explore the coral reef "twilight zone," or mesophotic (deep) coral reefs between 150 and 330 feet deep. His research is primarily focused on the remote reefs of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, but has taken him to numerous localities across the tropical Pacific. In his spare time, Kosaki enjoys reading about fish, looking at fish, photographing fish, catching fish, cooking fish, and eating fish (while watching old Broadway musicals).

Paul McKimmy
University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, United States

Biography

Paul McKimmy is interim Associate Vice Provost for Academic Excellence at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa where he leads the tenure and promotion process, co-chairs the distance learning advisory committee, reviews policy and contract cases, and coordinates professional development for faculty.

Dr McKimmy has a combined thirty years of experience in higher education, including twenty years with the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa College of Education. As the College’s Director of Technology & Distance Programs, his roles included planning and managing instructional support services, technical services, and development of distance programs. As a faculty member in the Learning Design & Technology department, he also developed curriculum and taught courses in instructional design, academic technology, and online learning. He continues to serve on doctoral committees with the department.

Dr McKimmy holds a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Western Michigan University, Master's degrees in College Student Personnel and Guidance and Counseling from Bowling Green State University, and a Bachelor's in Business Administration from Hope College.

Kanoe Morishige
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), United States

Biography

Born and raised in Kapahulu on Oʻahu, Kanoe Morishige is the Native Hawaiian Program Specialist and NOAA Affiliate for Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument supporting Native Hawaiian advocacy and engagement across research, policy, and management to guide the co-management of PMNM. For the past fourteen years through her work in the Native Hawaiian non-profit organisation, Nā Maka Onaona, she has been working alongside local communities perpetuating Native Hawaiian knowledge systems, integrating western scientific tools, and building capacity of youth leadership to support ʻāina momona, healthy and productive lands, oceans, and communities.

Hindsight, Foresight, and Our Post-COVID Future
Keynote Presentation: Paul McKimmy

The COVID pandemic challenged higher education to adapt to new parameters on a timeline no one saw coming. Typically slow to change, educational institutions made difficult changes on an accelerated timeline and under stressful conditions. Components of online education shifted from secondary to primary importance for nearly all institutions. As a result, some colleges closed under the strain. Now in the post-pandemic phase, we can reflect on which pre-pandemic institutional efforts paid dividends during the crisis. As a lead on the planning and support of online programs at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, and as chair of the Mānoa Distance Learning Committee, the presenter was positioned to support and observe efforts in multiple programs. This presentation will discuss observations and predictions relating to promising institutional strategies that have and will continue to benefit our programs in the post-pandemic reality.

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Internationalisation and Cooperation in East Asian Higher Education
Keynote Presentation: Brendan Howe

East Asia (including both Northeast Asia and Southeast Asia) is a region that has contributed greatly to the concept of an “Asia-Pacific Century.” This focus has been justified by the East Asian economic development “miracle,” the absence of interstate war in the “long peace of East Asia,” and an “Eastphalian peace.” Reference has also been made to East Asia’s other miracle, the decline of mass atrocities, while Freedom House notes it is the only region of the world to have made significant gains in political freedoms in recent years. Educational institutions in the region have made steady progress up international league tables. There is growing participation by East Asian scholars in international conferences such as those organised by ISA, WISC, DSA, and AAS, and a growing number of conferences organised by such associations in Asia. Yet, many obstacles stand in the way of a true internationalisation of higher education. These include a paucity of resources, a shortage of publishing outlets, language barriers, an emphasis on hard sciences and disciplines which promote economic growth (econophoria), and relatedly, the pull of policy relevant work that offers greater prestige and financial rewards. In some cases, nationalism, and in other cases a subaltern relationship to the West (sometimes both together), restrict regional educational cooperation and development. This presentation will discuss some of these issues and shortcomings, but also propose opportunities for overcoming the challenges.

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Hidden Hawaiʻi: A Huakaʻi through the Native Realities of Our Island Home
Keynote Presentation: Julie Kaomea

A huakaʻi is a journey taken with purpose and intention. In contrast to a pleasure-seeking tour of “must-see” attractions, our kūpuna set off on huakaʻi with humility, respect, and an open mind, allowing themselves to be moved and transformed by the people and places they meet along the way. In a similar spirit, I invite you to join in this virtual huakaʻi to the “Hidden Hawaiʻi” experienced by a group of classroom teachers and graduate students in my semester-long course in Contemporary Native Hawaiian Education. We’ll journey back in time to uncover the suppressed histories of a once flourishing and internationally recognised Hawaiian nation. We’ll lay bare the stark, contemporary realities behind the touristic sheen of glossy postcard images and expose the US military’s thinly veiled threats to our Native existence. Finally, we’ll venture to hidden kipuka or tucked away oases of aloha ʻāina that have thus far resisted the ravages of rampant capitalism and development – small sovereign spaces where Kānaka can put our hands to the soil once more to unearth, cultivate, and reimagine visions of more sovereign and sustainable, Indigenous Hawaiian futures.

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Weaving Knowledge Systems and Nurturing the Next Generation to Care for Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument
Panel Presentation: Pelika Andrade, Kai Hoshijo, Haunani Kāne, Randall Kosaki, Kanoe Morishige

We will highlight the diverse ways in which Kānaka ʻŌiwi (Native Hawaiian) are active in weaving ancestral knowledge systems, values, practices into multi-disciplinary research and indigenous science. These collective efforts will highlight how these ʻŌiwi and the Papahānaumokuākea Native Hawaiian Cultural Working Group are integral to protecting Papahānaumokuākea where there is no division between natural and cultural resources. These efforts are part of more than two decades of ʻŌiwi leaders and communities building pilina and kuleana to care for Papahānaumokuākea as an extension of the communities we call home.

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Voyaging: From the Canoe to the Classroom
Panel Presentation: Chris Blake, Mark K. Ellis, Catherine Fuller, Linda Furuto

This panel is composed of seasoned Poynesian Voyaging Society crew members who are also educators at levels ranging from elementary to university to the larger community. The panel will discuss transmitting the lessons of the canoe to students of all ages as well as the educational platform being launched for the Moananoiākea voyage planned to start in 2023.

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Hawaiian Cultural Presentation: Poi Pounding
Cultural Presentation: Darwin Kaneaiakala

Poi is a traditional staple of Hawaiian cuisine, and is made from taro, breadfruit or plantain that is pounded into a smooth paste and eaten by hand. This Hawaiian cultural presentation demonstrates the Hawaiian traditional protocols of poi pounding using traditional tools and the kalo (taro). A tasting of the fresh poi will culminate the presentation.

Read presenter's biography